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1984 633CSi Rises again!

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songzunhuang
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Re: 1984 633CSi Rises again!

Post by songzunhuang » Sun Dec 22, 2019 9:22 pm

ron wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:18 pm
The only way is to drill it out at the head of the stud (you will see the head turning inside the plastic).Then using Araldite or similar, glue a stainless 6mm. bolt back in.

I've done this quite a few times with no problems.
Thanks for the information. I tried once again to figure out how to get this part without destroying g the screw and I just can’t see a way.

When I drill it out, I’m assuming that I’ll be taking off the amber lens and drilling from the front of the assembly correct? There’s just no way to get to anything from the backside. It too tight in there with so many things in the way.
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Song Huang
1984 633CSi
Last 7 of VIN: 6997383

songzunhuang
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Hella H4s and a permanent Exhaust Hangar?

Post by songzunhuang » Mon Dec 23, 2019 6:43 am

A few updates have happened to the car. First, when I was replacing my headlights, I saw many reviews of Hella H4's as brighter alternatives. OK, I could use a brighter more focused light. So I replaced both my lights with some H4's. They are definitely a much more substantial headlight with a removable bulb. There's also quite a protective rubber surround to prevent moisture and dirt I suppose.
HellaH4.png
New H4s on left. Normal halogen on right.
HellaH4.png (1.31 MiB) Viewed 398 times
After I installed the driver side (right in the picture), I took this shot. In the daylight the difference isn't so obvious. I will say at night there is a difference. It's more focused and appears brighter to me after several commutes.
HellaH4 install.png
New H4 is on the right in the picture.
HellaH4 install.png (1.19 MiB) Viewed 398 times
I also noticed a small leak of power steering fluid. It's very small, but I purchase a rebuild kit just for the heck of it. I was also checking my rear brakes when I noticed that my exhaust hangar had broken again. These things seems to break a lot. I've replaced 3 sets during my 5 years of ownership.
BrokenHangar.png
A very broken exhaust hangar.
BrokenHangar.png (1.43 MiB) Viewed 398 times
I started thinking that there had to be a better solution. I grabbed some galvanized pipe strap and created a super re-enforced version of the exhaust hanger. I'm not sure if this will take away some of the resilience and flexibility of the rubber and if that'll have any affect. Once again, I'll report back once I have tried this for several weeks.
HangarFix.png
The strongest exhaust hanger and maybe the last I'll ever need.
HangarFix.png (1.05 MiB) Viewed 398 times
Incidentally, if anyone wants to purchase standard Halogen low-beam bulbs for cheap, let me know. One is only a week old. The other a few years.
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Song Huang
1984 633CSi
Last 7 of VIN: 6997383

ron
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Re: 1984 633CSi Rises again!

Post by ron » Mon Dec 23, 2019 10:35 am

songzunhuang wrote:
Sun Dec 22, 2019 9:22 pm
ron wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:18 pm
The only way is to drill it out at the head of the stud (you will see the head turning inside the plastic).Then using Araldite or similar, glue a stainless 6mm. bolt back in.

I've done this quite a few times with no problems.
Thanks for the information. I tried once again to figure out how to get this part without destroying g the screw and I just can’t see a way.

When I drill it out, I’m assuming that I’ll be taking off the amber lens and drilling from the front of the assembly correct?


Yes. Drill from the front. If you get someone to turn the rusted nut, you should be able to see where the head of the stud is.
They are ALWAYS rustier than you thought!!!!!!
'85 M #228
'87 M #367
'88 High line.
'80 735i
'10 X5

songzunhuang
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Replacing Rubber bits - exhaust hangers and air intake

Post by songzunhuang » Mon Dec 30, 2019 6:39 am

So I am really beginning to adopt the practice of only ordering OEM parts when possible. I have had very poor luck with aftermarket stuff. Even things that seem inconsequential seem to be a big deal. Case in point. About 3 years ago, I replace the air intake with an aftermarket unit. This weekend, I replaced it with a OEM BMW part as the aftermarket one was cracking. Take a look.
AirIntake.png
Aftermarket parts are very questionable.
AirIntake.png (1.82 MiB) Viewed 332 times
Then there was the saga of the exhaust hangers. I've replaced 2 sets in as many years. That's ridiculous. I finally ordered OEM BMW units, but I went ahead and utilized my little pipe strap trick. These should last a long time. Here's the new BMW hangar next to the less than 2 year old aftermarket unit. Also , there's that galvanized strap.
Exhaust Hangers.png
The OEM hanger is so much better quality.
Exhaust Hangers.png (1.44 MiB) Viewed 332 times
Finally, here's the exhaust hanger installed with the strap re-enforcement in place. I hope to never have to deal with these again.
EHangersInstalled.png
New hangars with re-enforcement.
EHangersInstalled.png (998.69 KiB) Viewed 332 times
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Song Huang
1984 633CSi
Last 7 of VIN: 6997383

songzunhuang
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New Half-Shaft Boot and CV joint repack

Post by songzunhuang » Mon Dec 30, 2019 7:13 am

While under my car, I noticed that the rubber CV joint boot was completely torn. Well, time to learn another task! I ordered the parts from Pelican parts since they could get it to me in a day and while I waited, I did a bunch of research on the task at hand. I realized that special tools would be needed so, the first order of business was to grab an 8mm socket and then a special C-clip ring plier. I found these at O-Reilly for only $20 for both!
Also the CV Boot replacement kit was very well equipped including the packet of grease and they even give you a pack of Locktite in the deal. This kit was $24.25.
CV Parts.png
Tools and a very complete kit.
CV Parts.png (1.29 MiB) Viewed 332 times
I had read nightmare stories about getting the 8mm bolts off and I was prepared for the worst. I spent lots of time cleaning and digging out the dirt from the bolts to make sure that I would maximize my chances of success. Also, I had a breaker bar ready. Much to my surprise, I was able to get the bolts off with just a normal 3/8" socket wrench and the 8mm socket. I also used my parking brake to help secure the wheel hub part, rotating the bolts to the bottom for easiest access. The only trick was to be sure that the socket was fully seated before turning. Also, after I removed all the bolts, there was enough play in the CV joint that I removed the half shaft without much trouble. I was actually surprised that it went so smoothly. Also with the C-clip plier, removing the clip and tapping out the splined shaft with a hammer was pretty easy as well. BTW - the picture below was after much cleaning of the CV joint. It was a greasy nasty mess in there.
Work part 1.png
Sequence to remove the shaft and joint.
Work part 1.png (1.86 MiB) Viewed 332 times
The CV joint itself is a beautiful sight to behold. Getting the steel balls out was just a matter of angling the joint parts correctly and pushing out the balls. After disassembly, I cleaned all the parts and reassembled it, then packed the new grease into the joint. What a messy job that was! In order to get the caps back on, I used a few bolts as a guide and then my very wide vise grips to press on the caps. This part of the process went rather smoothly.
Work Part 2.png
Cleaning and packing the cv joint.
Work Part 2.png (1.59 MiB) Viewed 332 times
Finally, after much cleaning and putting the Locktite into the holes, I reassembled the entire half-shaft with the new boot. In total, this was about a 2.5 hour job - including a run to the store to get the tools.
New CV Boot.png
New CV boot and CV joint cleaned and repacked.
New CV Boot.png (1.26 MiB) Viewed 332 times
Overall this job wasn't as terrible as I was expecting. Things went rather smoothly and also, I cannot recommend enough a YouTube video I watched of someone re-packing a CV joint. It was a 3-series BMW, but the half-shaft was exactly like our e24. Here's a link to the video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ck6iw2ygfXc&t=626s

If you ever need a new boot, this could save you a few hundred bucks!
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Song Huang
1984 633CSi
Last 7 of VIN: 6997383

songzunhuang
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Part to rebuild a Brake Booster

Post by songzunhuang » Fri Jan 10, 2020 1:23 am

I added to a thread in another part of the forum to address a power steering leak. It was tracked down to the brake booster and I am beginning to gather the parts to rebuild it. Jay has a rebuild kit with all the bits needed, but I was informed that a potentially brittle plastic part could be replaced with a nice machined aluminum unit. I’m a sucker for nicely reproduced machined aluminum parts! So I ordered it and was not disappointed. Here’s a shot of what you get for $60.
2227C42D-F124-42C0-8DC1-F10D3B887B44.jpeg
AlumBooster
2227C42D-F124-42C0-8DC1-F10D3B887B44.jpeg (269.1 KiB) Viewed 248 times
This removes the need for one of the custom tools needed to pull the existing seal, and it also eliminates worries of damaging the potentially brittle 35 year old plastic part that required modification. Now when I get the rest of the bits from Jay, I’ll be all ready to do the rebuild. Incidentally, I’m planning to do the power steering pump as well for good measure. More pics when the deed is done!

====< Update - Wednesday, January 15, 2020 >====
I received the rest of the o-rings from Jay today. I'll be all set to attack this leak this weekend. I'm looking forward to having no stains on the driveway again!
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Song Huang
1984 633CSi
Last 7 of VIN: 6997383

songzunhuang
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Power Steering Pump Rebuild

Post by songzunhuang » Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:37 am

Today I finally addressed my screeching power steering pump. I also rebuilt my brake booster, but that'll be the next post. I learned a few things along the way and I thought I'd document and share them here.

First, here are all the bits that I endeavored to install this weekend. This would reseal all my power steering bits and eliminate squeals and leaks.
Kit Pieces.png
This weekend's goal. Seal up everything!
Kit Pieces.png (848.48 KiB) Viewed 163 times
After draining the fluid reservoir, I was pondering how to remove the power steering pump,I realized a few things.
1. Loosen the 3 bolts holding the pulley first. Having the belt tension makes it easy to turn with a 13mm socket.
2. Take the tension off the belt and then remove the pulley.
3. Loosed or remove the two fluid lines connecting to the pump.

The pump can be removed quite easily without messing with taking off all the brackets. Here's a picture below. The pump just drops out after you remove these and there's only one bolt (lower right) holding the pump together at that point, making it easy to crack open.
Powersteeering pump removl.png
Easy way to remove pump.
Powersteeering pump removl.png (1.17 MiB) Viewed 163 times
Then came the cleanup and rebuild of the pump. Here's the commentary to go along with the sections in the picture below:

1. I used 2 flat blade screw drivers to pry up the case around the pump vanes.
2. Here are all the bits scattered on a rag. The seals only go in one way so are pretty hard to mess up.
3. Using the old seal and a mallet to press in the new seal. Hardest thing was replacing the front seal. Easiest way to the old seal out is to put the front aluminum part of the pump in a vise and then use a large screwdriver to lever out the old seal. One big whack it it just popped out.
4. Of course I had to make it pretty. I cleaned up and painted the pulley.
5. Here's the new ceramic filter before installation.
Several Steps.png
Collage of steps to rebuild.
Several Steps.png (1.68 MiB) Viewed 163 times
I started this at about 11am in the morning and was done around 3:30pm. So it wasn't hard, but time consuming. Also, I did lots of cleaning up along the way. Whenever I have things apart, I like to clean up since I have access to many parts of the car that are normally impossible to reach. Just for kicks , here's what the underside of the car looked like.
Underside.png
While I'm here, why not get a picture?
Underside.png (2 MiB) Viewed 163 times
Now, notice I didn't mention the filling of the fluid and test? Well, that's because I still have to tackle the brake booster rebuild! I started that at about 4pm but only had 1.5 hours before it got dark. I decided to finish the job the next day. Read on to the next post!
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Song Huang
1984 633CSi
Last 7 of VIN: 6997383

songzunhuang
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Brake Booster Rebuild - Trials and Tribulations

Post by songzunhuang » Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:25 am

So, picking up from the same day, I actually removed my brake booster in the afternoon, but by the time I had it rebuilt, it was dark. So I spent about 2 hours the next morning to install the booster, fill the fluids and then test it all. Spoiler alert - everything worked out wonderfully! But, let's get through the steps.

Removing the Brake Booster wasn't so difficult. I found ways to access all the bolts with the various tools I had. Also, I discovered that I could move the master brake cylinder back and get enough clearance to take out the brake booster. I didn't have to remove the brake master cylinder, thus saving me the hassle of bleeding all the brakes. Then metal brake lines are actually pretty flexible. When removing the brake booster, the trick was to angle it down to remove it. There's plenty of room going downwards.

I created a tool for containing the spring pressure using a few bolts and a wire protection plate, normally used to protect electrical wires as they pass through 2 x 4 wooden studs in homebuilding. That plate was only $0.99. All the parts for this tool totaled less than $8.
Step 1.png
Removing the brake booster.
Step 1.png (1.22 MiB) Viewed 163 times
After I got the booster apart, replacing all of the o-rings and seals was pretty easy. This was especially made simple because I used the upgraded aluminum piece, which already had the seal installed. I didn't want to mess with dremeling the old plastic piece and creating another tool to remove that seal. Incidentally, I have a spare plastic piece for the brake booster if anyone needs it.

My front seal was also leaking. Replacing it was simple with the picking tool. I made sure and installed it below the white split nylon ring. It all fit together very quickly.
Step 2.png
Apart and reassembling.
Step 2.png (1.52 MiB) Viewed 163 times
It was about this time that it got dark. It had taken me about 1.5 hours up to this point. I removed the booster, took it apart and replaced all the seals. It'd be the next morning before I finished everything else.

So the next morning, I noticed the tiny filter in the high pressure hole of the booster. I cleaned it out well, although it did not look clogged at all. I also used some self adhesive neoprene to create a gasket to seal where the brake booster would meet the firewall.
Step 3.png
Final before install.
Step 3.png (1.47 MiB) Viewed 163 times
Getting the booster back into the car wasn't difficult. All of the parts lined up well and the only tricky bolt (very tight space) was handled with a simple socket extension and a 13mm socket. In the picture below you can see where the shackle connects to the the brake pedal. In the picture to the right, I am accessing that bolt in very tight quarters.
Step 4.png
Final installation.
Step 4.png (1.5 MiB) Viewed 163 times
Another observation was that the rubber seal that goes between the brake booster and the brake master cylinder should be included in some of the rebuild kits. Since it took me the course of 2 days to do this, the master cylinder seal sat open to the air overnight. It must of swollen of something because the seal expanded to where it no longer fit in the recess when I was trying to reassemble it. I pressed it in the best I could, but ended up crushing bits of the rubber between the brake master cylinder and booster when I tightened it. As far as I can tell, no fluids are in the space between the two parts. It seems like it's ok if it's not perfectly sealed. In the end, I think it's still sealed up, but just the rubber is now deformed. I'm planning on replacing that rubber seal in the not-too-distant future. Since I can do this without much more than removing the two 13mm bolts holding the parts together, this shouldn't be a big deal.

After all this was in place, I filled the reservoir with Liquid Moly fluid and then cranked up the car. It took a few moments for the pump to start moving the fluid, but once it did, I could tell things were much better. There was no screech at all. I also drove the car around and tested the braking, which all worked splendidly.

So in the end, all looks well. In the next days I'll see if any leaks appear, but I am confident that things will be very good. A big shoutout to Jay for his excellent instructions and pictures. Also to the folks on this forum who continue to give me the confidence to do anything to this car!
-----
Song Huang
1984 633CSi
Last 7 of VIN: 6997383

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jps635
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Re: 1984 633CSi Rises again!

Post by jps635 » Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:04 pm

Once you know you've got all the air out, make sure you haven't overfilled the reservoir, which you won't know about until you leave the car standing for a week or so, which will leave you scratching your head and ATF everywhere.
Do this by fully discharging the brake bomb with the lid off the reservoir. Fluid level will rise and should settle 10mm below top. Wrap a couple rags around the reservoir to soak up any overflow but you will be able to keep an eye on this easily with LHD
'85 635csi JPS (RA2-66)

songzunhuang
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Re: 1984 633CSi Rises again!

Post by songzunhuang » Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:56 am

jps635 wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:04 pm
Once you know you've got all the air out, make sure you haven't overfilled the reservoir, which you won't know about until you leave the car standing for a week or so, which will leave you scratching your head and ATF everywhere.
Do this by fully discharging the brake bomb with the lid off the reservoir. Fluid level will rise and should settle 10mm below top. Wrap a couple rags around the reservoir to soak up any overflow but you will be able to keep an eye on this easily with LHD
Thanks for the tip.
I filled the reservoir to the line, ran the car for a while cranking the steering left and right. Then I shut off the car and pumped the brake pedal about 30 times to be sure and discharge the bomb. I ended up having to put about a cup more fluid to get it to the line. I drove to work and back today (about 84 miles round trip) and everything is working very well. There's not even a slight screeching sound. The steering and brakes all seem to work well. My commute is over a mountain road so I get to test the steering and brakes a lot.

I'll keep an eye out for any leaks and I'll keep checking the reservoir level.
-----
Song Huang
1984 633CSi
Last 7 of VIN: 6997383

rhanley 635csi89
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Re: 1984 633CSi Rises again!

Post by rhanley 635csi89 » Tue Jan 21, 2020 2:19 pm

Song,
Well done, add insurance to the finished product by adding a magnet inside the ATF Reservoir to collect the microscopic metal particles.
Magnets may also be fitted to the oil filter.
Search the forum there are a number of write ups, here's one of them.
Roger

http://bigcoupe.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.ph ... 084#149084
89 635CSiA (11/88 build)
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87 L6 635CSI Sold
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songzunhuang
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Re: 1984 633CSi Rises again!

Post by songzunhuang » Wed Jan 22, 2020 1:59 am

rhanley 635csi89 wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 2:19 pm
Song,
Well done, add insurance to the finished product by adding a magnet inside the ATF Reservoir to collect the microscopic metal particles.
Magnets may also be fitted to the oil filter.
Search the forum there are a number of write ups, here's one of them.
Roger

http://bigcoupe.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.ph ... 084#149084
Ooh, I have lots of these strong magnets that came off name tags and such from work. I guess I could just drop one or two of those in there, assuming that they are not so small as to plug up the holes.

Interesting tip to try. Thanks.
-----
Song Huang
1984 633CSi
Last 7 of VIN: 6997383

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